Amman Citadel

This historic site is situated in the centre of Amman, Jordan. It is also known in Arabic as Jabal al-Qal’a, the site of ancient Rabbath-Ammon. Occupied since the Bronze Age, it’s surrounded by a 1700m-long wall, which was rebuilt many times during the Bronze and Iron Ages, as well as the Roman, Byzantine and Umayyad periods.

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There is plenty to see there. The Citadel’s most striking sights are the Temple of Hercules and the Ummayad Palace.

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The two giant standing pillars are the remains of the Roman Temple of Hercules. Once connected to the Forum (downtown). The temple was built during the reign of Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius.

 

This place is amazing and there is a lot to see. When you walk around the site you also have a good view of the city.

The Citadel’s most impressive series of historic buildings are focused around the Umayyad Palace, behind the small (and rather old-fashioned) archaeological museum. Believed to be the work of Umayyad Arabs and dating from about AD 720, the palace was an extensive complex of royal and residential buildings and was once home to the governor of Amman. Its lifespan was short – it was destroyed by an earthquake in AD 749 and was never fully rebuilt.

A courtyard immediately north of the hall leads to a 10m-wide colonnaded street, lined with numerous arches and columns, and flanked by residential and administrative buildings. Further to the north is the former governor’s residence, which includes the throne room.

I had an amazing day here. I learned a lot about the Byzantine age. There’s lots of history over here.

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The only access roads to the Citadel are from Al Malek Ali Bin Al Hussein St. It’s better to hire a taxi for the trip up . It is recommended to walk down the hill: you will have a great view of the Roman Amphitheatre.

25 thoughts on “Amman Citadel

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  1. Great post of an era so long gone and yet there. To see the pillars and other remnants from Marcus Aurelius time is amazing as are all the sites.
    The stones themselves…polished by sand, sun, rain and wind.

    Thank you

    miriam

    Liked by 2 people

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